Friday, 18 October 2013

Ang Koo Kueh (紅龟粿)

One of my favorite kueh is Ang Koo Kueh (紅龟粿).  I used to buy this from a stall in Cantonment Road or another one in Alexandra Road.  For the first stall, they have many varieties such as durian, mung bean, yam etc.  

As I no longer stay near there or head that way often, I have to buy from others which are really yucky and that is why for a long time, I never eaten one.  

Suddenly the crave strike and I spotted some purple sweet potatoes in the supermarket which is a rare find so I decided to make some.

This is perfect to use my new mould that I bought long ago.  Really love the dept of this rather than the plastic one that I used previously.

This recipe is based on Do What I Like's and I have tried this twice and both time I enjoyed it very much, even my kids who aren't into chewy food like it.


I also chanced upon another recipe that doesn't used sweet potato and I might want to try that soon.




What you need:

Sweet Potato Skin: 
  

200 g sweet potatoes
300 g glutinous rice flour
2 tbsp + 2 tsp oil
160 ml water (adjust accordingly)
Some red coloring (optional)

Mung Bean Filling:
200g yellow split mung beans (soaked until soft)
100 g castor sugar
½ tsp salt
2 tbsps oil
¼ - ½ cup diced shallots
Water

Method:

Sweet Potato Skin:

Steam the sweet potatoes until soft. In a bowl, mash the sweet potatoes. 

Add glutinous rice, oil and water and mix well to obtain a smooth dough. Cover with a damp cloth and leave aside. You can add a little more water if the dough is too dry.

Mung Bean Filling:

Steam the yellow split mung beans until soft. 

Add in the sugar and mash with a hand held blender.

In a non-stick wok, fry the diced onions in oil. Leave aside to cool. 

In a bowl, mix the blended split peas, salt, fried onions, oil and enough water to form a soft dough.

Shaping the Ang Koo Kueh:

Brush the ang koo kueh mould with a little oil to ease removal of the kueh from the mould. (mine I didn’t and had no problem)

Take a small lump of sweet potato dough and using your palm or a rolling pin, flatten it, into a round shape with the centre thicker than the sides.

Spoon some bean filling into the dough, pinch the sides of the dough together, and using the palm of your hand, roll it into a ball.

Press the ball into the mould firmly, to obtain the design and shape of the mould.

Tap the mould gently on the table to remove the ang koo kueh from the mould.

Place the ang koo kueh on a square piece of oiled banana leaf.

When all the ang koo kuehs are shaped, steam them in a wok over high fire for 3 minutes covered. After 3 minutes, remove the cover to release steam, then re-cover and steam for another 3 minutes over a medium fire, until the kuehs are cooked.  (I didn't do this, I steam it for 5 mins straight).

Remove the kuehs from the wok and brush them with a little oil to prevent them from sticking to each other. Serve when cool.

Notes:
Based on this mould, I used 19g dough and 18g filling.




Enjoy your weekend!




20 comments:

  1. Edith, I can't wait to hop over here when I saw you posted your your pretty akk at AFC. Your akk look very “饱满” meaning fat fat... hahaa! Love to have a bite :D

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    Replies
    1. Ann we can always meet and I will make these for you.

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  2. The prints still turned out so sharply even after steaming. Looks great!

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    Replies
    1. Alan, I only steam it for 5 mins.

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  3. Very beautifully done and tempting :) Have a wonderful day ahead, Edith :)

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  4. Lovely AKK. I'll be on the lookout for your other recipe without sweet potatoes. I tried once and the skin was tough, not as soft as my pandan AKK.

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    Replies
    1. Sokehah, without sweet potato is tough? I will try and see whether the recipe is better or not. Stay tuned.

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  5. Oh, Edith... I have another query. Do they, the skin, I mean, stay soft even after being cooled for a couple of hours?

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    Replies
    1. Yes these stay soft even after cooled.

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  6. thanks for the tips Edith! this is awesome

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  7. hi Edith, you made it so perfectly
    I am too lazy to make angku kueh I usually just buy, but til today still cant find shop selling nice one
    perhaps I should just try to make :)

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    Replies
    1. Alice, try this. It is not difficult to make after you prepared the fillings.

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  8. I love the color a lot, so pretty! I too want to try the one without sweet potato:)

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  9. Hi Edith, happened to come across this lovely AKK of yours. Same as Soke Hah, I'm keen to know if you have tried making AKK without using sweet potatoes and do they stay soft and chewy? I thought of making some since I was told AKK with sweet potatoes turns rancid quite fast.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Kimmy, I have never attempted AKK without sweet potatoes but I think the texture will be mochi like. Store AKK in the fridge and resteam it when you want to eat. I think that way, it will not turn rancid as fast. Other wise, maybe make a smaller portion.

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  10. Lovely mould you have there, Edith! I would love to get my hands on wooden moulds for.various types of kuehs but I have no idea where I could find them. Would you mind sharing where you got yours from?

    Eivuluvie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You can get it from Phoon Huat if you are staying in Singapore.

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Thanks for dropping by. If you have tried a recipe, do share with me your experience. It will be nice to hear from you. Cheers

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